Why Lower Corporate Tax Rates?

Why Lower Corporate Tax Rates?

We've had a few readers ask why Congress wanted to lower corporate tax rates in the US. In particular, US corporations already have record-setting profits--why do they need more money? Should we, instead, be raising taxes on corporations? Indeed, plenty of articles make the case that the corporate tax cuts won't create jobs at all. 

The problem with these articles is that their counter-arguments are all arguing against the wrong argument. The logic behind a corporate tax cut is not in fact, "more corporate profits will mean more jobs." 

If that's not the argument, what is?

 

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Train Your Brain to Think Clearly About Politics

Train Your Brain to Think Clearly About Politics

Politics tap into an unusual mixture of reason and emotion. We want to have the right answer, which requires a neutral interpretation of information and events. However, it is human nature to want to feel like we have the right answer, especially when the topic is something we care deeply about. 

There is a disconnect between the pure detachment required for cool-headed discussion and the often uncontrollable emotions that are part of our nature. This is why an impassioned speech can sway huge groups of individuals better than an exceptionally well-informed but detached policy paper.

How can we train ourselves to think more effectively about politics?

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What's Behind the Growing Pay-Productivity Gap? Pt 2, Measurement Problems

What's Behind the Growing Pay-Productivity Gap? Pt 2, Measurement Problems

In the last post, we explored some different common hypotheses behind the observed phenomenon of a growing gap between worker productivity and worker pay. 

Today we'll look at how tough it is to explain this gap based on how hard it is to measure different parts of the graph--and, luckily, find a few places that seem a little more pinned down.

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What's Behind the Growing Pay-Productivity Gap? Pt 1, Hypotheses

What's Behind the Growing Pay-Productivity Gap? Pt 1, Hypotheses

What's behind the growing gap between US worker productivity and their pay? In this first half of the analysis, we look at some of the common knee-jerk answers and some of their complications.

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Roy Moore's Loss Doesn't Tell Us Much About Alabama

Roy Moore's Loss Doesn't Tell Us Much About Alabama

While Jones' victory does have major implications for US politics, much of the media makes a mistake by taking the result of a slim margin and extrapolating it as a bellwether for the entire state or nation. 

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Misrepresenting Policy: The GOP "Private Jet Owner Tax Cut"

Misrepresenting Policy: The GOP "Private Jet Owner Tax Cut"

The Senate tax reform bill that just passed has many changes, but one that took some flak was an apparent tax cut for private jet owners. As is often the case, the story is more complicated than it seems at first blush. All another reminder to be critical about what you read, no matter how you lean politically.

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Two-Party System Drowning US Politics; Ireland Offers a Lifeboat

Two-Party System Drowning US Politics; Ireland Offers a Lifeboat

Of the United States’ many political problems, one glaring issue is the fact that we have a two-party system representing a wide array of opinions.

It’s a bigger problem than most people think. But it doesn't have to be this way.

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What's in the GOP Senators' Tax Bill?

What's in the GOP Senators' Tax Bill?

The Senate is working on their own version of a tax bill that would need to be reconciled with, or replace, the House is working on. We're going to look at what's in the Senate bill. We've seen a lot of oversimplification of this that seems to intentionally cherry-pick certain parts of it without looking at the whole picture. 

So let's dive in and figure out what's going on.

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Nazis, Communists, and Free Speech

Nazis, Communists, and Free Speech

For all their differences, national socialism and communism have one essential similarity: they both justify mass murder by promising utopia. Their versions of utopia differ, but they are believed to be attainable, not theoretical. First, though, society must pass through a period of chaos, anarchy and mass violence. This transition period - the struggle -  is endured since what comes after is expected to be a revolutionary better world.  But the need to endure a time of extreme violence is not a small part of either philosophy - it is a core aspect of both. A better world can be had. But first there must be killing.

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US Political Parties are Gnarly Coalitions--This Means They Can Be Rebuilt

US Political Parties are Gnarly Coalitions--This Means They Can Be Rebuilt

A pretty amazing new study from Pew Research shows that the parties are fragile coalitions, full of very deep disagreement. This fragility means many very interesting things could happen in the future... and that your stereotypes of each party may not make sense. 

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